Man pushing a sled with weights in car park, head sweats

You might know the feeling. You've ordered something a bit spicy in a restaurant, or simply gone for a walk on a hot day - and the sweat starts rolling down your face.

It's usually nothing to worry about - sweating from your face, head or scalp is natural. When we exercise or get too warm, our bodies release sweat to cool us down.

Head sweats can also be triggered when you're nervous or stressed. Again, it's only a natural reaction, but they can be embarrassing in work or social situations.

man rubbing forehead, head sweats

It could be medical...

Sometimes, excessive sweating from the head and face can be put down to a medical condition called craniofacial hyperfidrosis, which is caused by overactive sweat glands.

Another condition is secondary hyperhidrosis. This can be caused by the side effects of medication, a change in your hormone levels, or damage to the body's nervous system. If you think your head sweating is being triggered by any of these it's important you talk to your doctor, to pinpoint the actual cause.

Sometimes, excessive sweating from the head and face can be put down to a medical condition called craniofacial hyperfidrosis, which is caused by overactive sweat glands.

What you can do to limit head sweating?

Yes, it can be uncomfortable and embarrassing. But there are a few steps you can take, to help stop those telltale beads of sweat forming:

1. Wash and cleanse your skin regularly

Giving you head, scalp and face a daily cleanse reduces the build-up of oil and dirt on your skin - the end of the day is a really good time.

2. Avoid spicy foods

If you're prone to excessive head and face sweating, it may be best to steer away from those dishes that contain lots of spices and garlic.

3. Keep track of when you sweat

What times of day, or in what situations, do you sweat the most? Keeping track will help you identify the underlying causes, and then manage them.

A girl leans over a sink with the tap running while washing her face
A lady in a shower looking up as water falls over her

Would a visit to the doctor help?

If you're suffering from excessive head sweating or, particularly, if you think you may have secondary hyperhidrosis, you should speak to you doctor or another medical professional.

There's a range of options available, and they may be able to recommend other treatments or medical procedures that can help.